Unsorted life hacks

From 43FoldersWiki

(Difference between revisions)
Jump to: navigation, search
Revision as of 01:29, 5 April 2005 (edit)
Instigase (Talk | contribs)

← Previous diff
Revision as of 02:47, 5 April 2005 (edit) (undo)
Y0mbo (Talk | contribs)
(Hacks from readers)
Next diff →
Line 127: Line 127:
* Mobile phones are great, but they can serve as an interruption in the flow of your day and ultimately cause more harm than good. One solution is to just leave it at home, but that's kind of cutting off your nose to spite your face. Try to get a cell phone that allows you to categorize your contacts and change the ringtones/settings for each group and in every ring profile (ie. silent, normal, noisy, etc.). Then just make some of those groups completely silent under one of your ring profiles so that those people can't interrupt you when you don't want them to. Leave some important contacts in groups that always ring if you really want/need to. It's okay sometimes for you to get interrupted or for you to have to suddenly switch contexts while in the middle of something (for instance, a very important friend who I may not hear from often is always welcome to interrupt). Just make sure that when it happens, it really is worth it, and it's not just some randomly useless event that could've been avoided. What's important to you could be business or personal, just make sure it really is important. --[[User:ThePolack|ThePolack]] 13:34, 3 Apr 2005 (EDT) * Mobile phones are great, but they can serve as an interruption in the flow of your day and ultimately cause more harm than good. One solution is to just leave it at home, but that's kind of cutting off your nose to spite your face. Try to get a cell phone that allows you to categorize your contacts and change the ringtones/settings for each group and in every ring profile (ie. silent, normal, noisy, etc.). Then just make some of those groups completely silent under one of your ring profiles so that those people can't interrupt you when you don't want them to. Leave some important contacts in groups that always ring if you really want/need to. It's okay sometimes for you to get interrupted or for you to have to suddenly switch contexts while in the middle of something (for instance, a very important friend who I may not hear from often is always welcome to interrupt). Just make sure that when it happens, it really is worth it, and it's not just some randomly useless event that could've been avoided. What's important to you could be business or personal, just make sure it really is important. --[[User:ThePolack|ThePolack]] 13:34, 3 Apr 2005 (EDT)
* Airport/Big Ass Event parking mnemonic: : use Your Zire7x / camera phone and get a picture of the locator sign nearest your car. Take 30 paces toward the event, turn around, face your car and photograph what the final approach would/should look like. [[User:Instigase|Instigase]] * Airport/Big Ass Event parking mnemonic: : use Your Zire7x / camera phone and get a picture of the locator sign nearest your car. Take 30 paces toward the event, turn around, face your car and photograph what the final approach would/should look like. [[User:Instigase|Instigase]]
 +* Kids and power tools: The plugs on power tools in the US have a small hole on each prong. To prevent children from plugging these in, put a small luggage lock through the hole and put the keys somewhere they won't find them. --[[User:y0mbo|y0mbo]]
<!-- ^^^ Add your new hack above this line please. Thanks! ^^^ --> <!-- ^^^ Add your new hack above this line please. Thanks! ^^^ -->
[[Category:Life hacks]] [[Category:Life hacks]]

Revision as of 02:47, 5 April 2005

Got a cool trick to share? Until we work out a good home, let's use this page to collect our favorite little life hacks. Reorganize as needed, and I guess eventually we'll come up with a better way to organize and categorize everything. --Merlin 11:37, 21 Mar 2005 (EST)

Starting to be organised? Check out Category:Life hacks for your favourite life hack genre!

Contents


Hacks from 43 Folders

  • The Forehead Ticket Trick - The car doesn't move until we know everyone has their ticket (as described at ETech '05)
  • The Sick Box - Gather all the stuff you'll need when you're sick: today
  • The One-Fork Rule - Beat back kitchen chaos by issuing everyone one piece of each item of cutlery and crockery
  • Just Buy Two - Buy multiples of stuff you always lose
  • Flame Yourself - Save relationships and embarrassment by sending that angry email to yourself
  • Document Your Haircut - Just got a haircut you like? Ask the operator to describe it in his/her own words, and then take a photo

Links to hacks from elsewhere

  • Hints from Heloise - "the high priestess of household hints" Before they were hip, 3x5's were used in universities for gathering research data. Before Merlin's 43Folders, Heloise and her Mom were the original Goddesses of the domestic hack. Stay here if you want to use your Moleskine effectively. Go to Heloise to get your stinky watch band smelling clean... --Instigase
  • Improving memory skills using visual imagery - Peg method and journey method overview.

Hacks from readers

Please add your new hack to the bottom of the list, and be sure to include your username and the date by using the signature tag: --~~~~. If you're adding or responding to an existing hack, please add it right below the one you're responding to. Thanks!

  • Coin flip hack - If I can't make a quick decision about something that can be simplified into two outcomes, I designate them as head and tails, flip a coin, call it in the air, and then (here's the important part!) completely disregard the result -- I nearly always feel a quick flash of "c'mon, come up tails" as it lands, so I just go with that. The distraction of flipping a coin pierces the indecision. --sckot Vokes 11:25, 22 Mar 2005 (EST)
    • Another Coin Flip Hack - Toss the coin. If you have the least inclination to toss it again you know you really wanted the other choice. --cath perry 2:33pm, 25 Mar 2005 (AEST)
  • Rechargable Batteries - Wrap an elastic band around any charged batteries : usually you can't insert them complete with band into a device, so thus you know that if you find a battery with a band on, it's charged... --Ajt 18:33, 21 Mar 2005 (EST)
  • Saving Batteries - If you have a device that uses batteries but you don't use it regularly and it seems like the batteries are always drained when you need it because it got turned on in your bag: turn one of the batteries around (flip + and -). That way the device cannot be turned on by mistake. --Victor 10:53, 23 Mar 2005 (EST) (this is a terrible idea, and can destroy your battery, or your device. Better to fold a small scrap of paper over the end of one battery to prevent electrical contact from being made.)
  • If you're a slob, and therefore haven't developed an efficient cleaning regimen, and you need to clean up fast: have your most anal-retentive, clean freak friend come over and walk through your place with a tape recorder and dictate what you need to do in the order it should be done. -- GH 21 Mar 05
  • Remember the number - sometimes you have a range of things to remember. Work out how many things you have to remember, and keep that number in mind. That way, you can quickly check if you've forgotten something. --Akchizar 02:13, 22 Mar 2005 (EST)
  • When I need to talk to someone about more than one thing, I begin the conversation with the number of things I need to discuss - eg. "I need to discuss 4 things with you" - that way we're both keeping track of where we are in the discussion. winwintoo March 2005
    • This works great when ordering takeout or at a fast food counter ("I need three sandwiches...")--Neil 15:01, 25 Mar 2005 (EST)
  • Nelson Algren: "Never sleep with a woman whose problems are worse than your own."
  • Honor thy circadian rhythms. If your wake/sleep schedule doesn't coincide with mother nature's, trick your internal clock with artificial lighting as many ways as you can. If you know you're going to go to bed at two in the morning, start dimming the lights in your house around 12:30. If you need to use the bathroom in the middle of the night, don't turn on any lights. There's nothing you need to see and you can probably find your way to the toilet blindfolded. When I wake up at o'dark thirty, I look at a light bulb (for brightness) with my eyes shut (to avoid retinal damage). It's like a cup of coffee.Yesno
    • Buy a 1000 Watt Halogen - you will not feel tired till you turn it off! No more winter Blues either. - Xponentially brighter than 2 500 Watt ones, the light levels are like a very sunny day - Caffeine free stimulation. Mount it away from flammable things tho' it gets hot.
  • If you really need to get your motor running in the AM, after your nice warm shower, make your water as cold as it gets and see how long you can take it. Just be careful that your heart doesn't explode.Yesno
    • The hot then cold shower is also really good after exercising to relax your muscles and then refresh you. --Fenris23 15:14, 28 Mar 2005 (EST)
  • Cardiovascular exercise--- running, biking, jumping-jacks, anything that gets your heart rate way up and keeps it there for at least twenty minutes--- is a life hack that people who don't exercise usually don't like to hear about. But a good cardio routine is as, or more, important for your mental health as for your physical. You won't lose any weight by running, for instance, unless 45 minutes= 1 Big Mac sounds like good math to you. I'd just skip the Big Mac. (I'd like to note that exercise does help you lose weight, not just the calories burned during exercise, but due to changing your fat/muscle ratio - the more muscle, the more calories you burn even while not exercising. See Losing weight with exercise from MedLine - SLA, March 24, 05) But a cardio workout will improve your mood and your focus, and it will help you go to sleep and wake up at regular times with no difficulty. Plus, there's nothing like a huge rush of beta endorphins in the morning!Yesno
  • Audiobooks, smart radio shows like This American Life and In Our Time , and particularly, recorded lectures, are sometimes better to fill your iPod with than music. They can make any time somewhat productive, keeping your mind busy when running or doing chores, and teaching you of topics arcane. I have listened to more than a dozen lectures from The Teaching Company and Barnes and Noble's Portable Professor. (You can get them free or cheap through the library or through friends you share with.) I regularly purchase audiobooks from iTunes and Tell-Tale Weekly. I prefer to listen to non-fiction. Fiction just doesn't translate well for many into audio, though epic and heroic poetry--- particularly Seamus Heany's recording of his translation of Beowulf--- works well too. A few colleges offer free lectures in MP3 format, and the lectures of Richard Feynman are always floating around on the net.Yesno
    • As a grad student in British lit, I use my iPod to try to force myself to memorize Shakespeare. Like, all of Shakespeare. Constant exposure == osmosis. I hope. --JW 23 Mar 05
    • Audio books are great for cheap mp3 players with not much memory because you can convert spoken work audio to much low bitrates than you would probably be willing to tolerate for music. I use a Windows program called dBpowerAMP (anyone know an OS X equivalent?) to convert books on the fly as I copy them to my mp3 player. I can cram quite a bit into just 256MB. --MVance 14:49, 24 Mar 2005 (EST)
    • iTunes and the iPod will do bookmarking with any AAC audio file--- even unprotected ones you've made yourself. On OS X, change the file type with a program like Quickchange to M4B. On Windows, just change the extension to M4B. (You can just change the extension with OS X too, if and only if the AAC has no file type. Because in a fight between file type and extension, iTunes picks the file type.) Now, you can easily pick up where you stopped listening to long recordings--- this is good for long music recordings, also.Yesno
    • Make Bookmarkable from Doug's AppleScripts to iTunes section also makes this process easier. Douglas Welch
    • Fill our ipod with foreign languages lessons. You can always find some language courses on sale in libraries. It makes your mind work and you will be impressed how much you can learn while commuting. Marika Thomas 7:26, 31 Mar 2005 (EST)
  • Tidying a particularly messy bedroom? Take everything off the floor and dump it onto the bed. Don't start sorting until everything is off the floor and on the bed. It makes sure you don't miss anything, and finally making the bed is a fantastic way to finish up a tidying session. --jk
  • My dorm room in college had a really oddly-shaped living room, with no light but a tiny flourescent wall sconce at the entrance of the room. Lamps didn't seem to carry light very well either, since there were odd corners in the room. One thing I discovered that worked pretty well was hanging icicle christmas lights (white light, of course) around the perimeter of the room. Not a very bright light, but enough to be comfortable and visible, and it diffuses about the entire room. Also works well if you place them near windows, since at night the light is reflected back in. -- Skadus, 03-24-2005 10:45 CST
  • Do you take medication in the morning and the evening (or more than once a day)? Can you remember if you've taken it? To help me, I flip the bottle over in the morning after I take mine, and when I see the bottle upside down (or right side up in the evening), I know I've already taken my pill. -- Donna 3/24/05
  • When I have to do something that I'm not looking forward to (like housework or paper filing), I set a kitchen timer for a short amount of time and start working. Once the timer goes off, I finish the immediate task and stop. I get more completed in that 15-30 minutes than I would otherwise, because I know that when the timer goes off I'm done. --Jeni 13:26, 3/24/05
  • Instead of using "Shuffle" in iTunes on a large music collection, set your library to sort by song title and play them sequentially instead. The names themselves are a source of entropy.
  • A couple more kitchen timer hacks:
    • Kids under eight years old often don't have a good sense of time passing. Using a timer can help avoid arguments when kids are taking turns playing with a video game or other toy.
    • When you absolutely have to wake up on time, use a kitchen timer as a backup to your regular alarm clock. You'll sleep better if you don't have to worry as much about oversleeping. --TomSackett 14:26, 24 Mar 2005 (EST)
  • To identify a song you heard on the radio/TV/Elevator/etc, try to remember one of the phrases in the chorus, then type it into a search engine between quote marks. --Cwenham 14:51, 24 Mar 2005 (EST)
  • Encourage your young child to ask questions, but make a rule: "No one-word questions." The child will learn more, and you'll stay saner, if she can't just ask "why?" to everything you say. Be flexible about this rule; "where?" can be an acceptable question, and "why not?" can be considered a one-word question, even if it has two. --TomSackett 15:06, 24 Mar 2005 (EST)
  • Surf asynchronously. Learn the shortcut for opening links in another tab (command-click, for example), and the shortcut for closing the tab (CMD-W). Then instead of launching news articles in the current tab, you add them to the end of the queue with command-click, then "eat" pages off the beginning of the queue with command-w. Browsing this way means you can go off on a dozen tangents without losing track of them. OmniWeb is particularly good for this because there's no UI penalty for opening lots of tabs. --Cwenham 15:30, 24 Mar 2005 (EST)
    • This works with Firefox too. If you also want to keep track of what you browse, you could use an extension like Tabbrowser Extensions, which keeps track of tabs and can save your tab automatically session so you can come back to it later. Xeelee 200.95.158.135 11:50, 27 Mar 2005 (EST)
  • To remind yourself of something when you get home, leave a message on your answering machine. I do this one all the time. This works best if you live alone or have a housemate/spouse/offspring who can be relied on to give you the message.--Jtboofle 16:17, 24 Mar 2005 (EST)
    • In a similar vein, I use the voicememo feature on my phone. To avoid navigating the menus each time, I set a voice command for it, so I just have to push one button and say "Record" and it starts recording. --MVance
  • Copy your cds if you're going to take them anywhere. I've got half a dozen cds that I've copied to keep in my truck. If they get scratched or someone wants to borrow them, no problem. The originals are still safely at home.--J.T. Boofle 16:19, 24 Mar 2005 (EST)
    • This provides insurance against theft as well. By doing this I was saved the time and expense of replacing around 50 CDs when my car was stolen. -- Kchrist 20:34, 1 Apr 2005 (EST)
  • Hard day at the office? Come home to the kids? Don't ask them about their day, tell them about yours! --RB 17:27, 24 Mar 2005 (EST)
  • For me, whiteboards are incredibly useful when I work (systems design meetings &c), so I make sure I have one handy whenever I can.. even when I go to a client.. If they don't have one, I get out a large sheet of paper (which I carry with me (folded), and tape it to the outside of a glass pane/window to create a background. At this point they'll start to look funny, with a strange kind of respect.. Works great, just make sure you use non-permanent markers ;-) Also handy for 'domestic planning sessions'.. cheapest whiteboards available -- Wafel 24 Mar 05
  • Rule #3, never answer a question with a question. -JWS 24 Mar 05
    • I would disagree. If I'm asked an inspecific question, I'll need clarification; I can avoid phrasing it as a question, but it would still *be* a question. -- [temujin9]
    • I disagree too. If you want to stop someone from being too nosy, try this: Them: "How much do you make?" You: "Why do you ask?" They usually get the hint! --JohnGraham 17:33, 29 Mar 2005 (EST)
  • Do you have friends that work in the medical field--in almost any capacity? Ask them to get you a big wad of free Post-It notes and a fistful of free pens from the drug reps. They hand out swag like candy. GH 24 Mar 05 (Ditto Allegra, Viagra, and a million other heavily-marketed drugs! --pnoeric 21:53, 26 Mar 2005 (EST))
  • Buy a big box of binder clips in various sizes. The big ones are especially handy for clipping objects together. Clip your mail to your keys, your tickets to your luggage, or a reminder to your bathroom mirror. Its like how teachers used to pin notes to you to make sure they made it home. You can't forget it if its attached to you. - CM 24 Mar 05
  • Stick a hook above your deadbolt. Then you can hang things from it like keys or bundles of outgoing mail in a binder clip (see above). [An example photo]. That way you can't forget it when you leave in the morning. - CM 24 Mar 05
  • Get a big box and put it near your door so you can dump your keys and wallet in it when you get home. I use a clementine box. Never lose your keys again! [An example photo]. - CM 24 Mar 05
    • Perhaps not keys: you may have an issue with bambooing - people lifting your keys from outside with a long stick. I promise I'm not making this up. --RB 15:06, 25 Mar 2005 (EST)
    • Plug your phone charger nearby and binder clip the end to the box so you can charge your phone too, making it ready to go! --JohnGraham 17:33, 29 Mar 2005 (EST)
    • If you don't want to part from your keys, you could try using a small chain(think punk); if that doesn't go with your style, use something else that physically ties your keys with you. I personally use a loop of rope with a keyholder on one end, and tie it to my belt. Never lost a key in years! Xeelee 200.95.158.135 11:50, 27 Mar 2005 (EST)
  • LED headlamps make great book lights for reading in bed. Get one that has multiple brightness settings so you can keep the light low while your partner is trying to sleep. --TomSackett 12:48, 25 Mar 2005 (EST)
  • APPAREL - Keep extra shoelaces on hands. They only cost a dollar or two and they can really spiff up an old pair of shoes. Plus you never know when you are going to break one. –Mose 11:56 AM 03/25/2005 (CST) This seems like a subcase of the Just Buy Two hack.--sckot 16:02, 25 Mar 2005 (EST)
  • When choosing passwords for random catalogs and webpages, choose 2 words and 2 numbers and always make your password a combination of the two. Ex.: rosey, shannon, 2, 3 -- your password will always be rosey23 or shannon32. This makes it a lot easier to guess at passwords when you return without having to keep a password text file. --kpearce 10:56, 27 Mar 2005 (EST)
  • If you're a member of AAA Autoclub and you have a Camera phone, take a picture of your membership card and use it as the picture for the emergency roadside assistance number in your phone. As long as you can make out the membership number you should be able to get assistance if you somehow lose your card. This should work for almost any Roadside Assistance Program. --RobNoxious 00:58, 28 Mar 2005 (EST)
    • I've seen this on flickr but can't find the link at the mo - take photos of the opening hours of shops you visit/ cinemas/ local cafes/ &c on your camera phone, so if you need to go there you can look them up quickly. --Sophia
  • This may be an adjunct to the "Buy Two" rule: I carry a copy of my Car Key in my wallet. It would be a rare moment that I managed to lock both my wallet and my keys in the car. It's come in handy more times than I care to admit. --RobNoxious 01:04, 28 Mar 2005 (EST)
  • Cigarette lighters - prevent the schwagging of your lighters:
  1. Never bring the Zippo with you to anyplace public. Especially if you will be drinking alcohol or partaking of any other intoxicating substances at any point. Break this rule, and it WILL disappear.
  2. When in public, keep a stash of no less than two cheap Bic lighters on you. If you are in a social situation - especially one involving drinking - someone will inevitably ask to borrow your lighter. Bics are cheap and easy to replace when that friend mindlessly pockets the lighter and walks away.
  3. Have a cheap Bic you use all the time in social situations, and don't want to lose it? Wrap a piece of medical tape around it and write your name on the tape. This is how they keep tabs on patients' lighters in psychiatric wards.
  4. Want to REALLY make sure nobody wants to steal your cheap lighter? First, paint the exterior in the loudest, girly-est color of nail polish you can find (if you need help with this, ask a 15 year old girl). Then, get some holographic stickers, but make sure they are very girly and insipid - this is one time when you do NOT want anything cool or funky. Liberally sprinkle said holographic stickers on lighter. Finally, paint over the stickers with clear nail polish to make sure they aren't likely to peel off. Be sure all nail polish is dry before using the lighter to light anything again. Your lighter may look silly after this, but it's a safe bet the only person who will schwag it will be that 15 year old girl... nobody else will mistake it as theirs, and nobody will want anyone else to, either!
--TresWife 02:50, 28 Mar 2005 (EST)
  • Cigarettes - If you smoke infrequently, or buy them by the carton, keep them in the freezer to maintain freshness. --TresWife 02:53, 28 Mar 2005 (EST)
  • Want to get the most fresh-breath benefit when you brush your teeth? Keep a clean spoon next to your toothbrush. In between toothbrushing and mouthwash, use the edge of the spoon to thoroughly scrape the top of your tongue, starting from as far back as you can comfortable go. It helps remove extra bacteria and gunk that brushing leaves behind - the same gunk that causes bad breath. There are products they actually sell for this purpose, but a spoon works just as well and whole lot cheaper. --TresWife 02:55, 28 Mar 2005 (EST)
  • Want to stop biting your nails? Buy a bunch of (say 10) nail files and keep them within arms reach in every place you regularly spend time, like your desk, the couch etc.
  • Wall Warts - I got about a hundred of these and have, on occasion, plugged the wrong one into a very expensive piece of gear and rendered it a very expensive piece of cr@p. Here's what I do now - upon getting a new wall wart (you know, those charger thingies) I label it with what it is supposed to charge. producer
    • Wall warts, usually made of black plastic, can be labeled easily with a metallic silver Sharpie marker.Link" -- GH 28 Mar 05
  • Sometimes I forget to grab my wallet on the way out the door. Since it's illegal to drive without a license (and often registration) handy, I got around my forgetfulness by keeping a spare wallet&em;with all the pertinent stuff&em;inside the glove compartment. That way, I never drive without my license, registration, or AAA card. This is also handier to access than lifting your butt up of the seat to hand your license to someone outside the car. Chris Gruber 050328 @ 1704 EST
    • As a corollary to this, place your proof of insurance in your car as soon you receive it to avoid those outrageous towing and impound fees you they sock you with, when you're pulled over, if you forget to do this. -- GH 28 Mar 05
  • When sorting out a big stack of various papers to recycle, quickly tear the ones you want to throw out halfway, or do something destructive to them so they stand out. This will keep you from accidentally picking them back up instead of throwing them away. I use this trick to make sure I don't mistakenly turn in draft versions of assignments - User:ChrisMetcalf
  • Tearing things is also a great visual, tactile, and mental hack to do when you're "done" with something. Got a big stack of HPDA cards to process? After you're done with each one, tear it. It feels good... try it! - User:ChrisMetcalf
  • Make it easy for yourself to do chores. I keep a bottle of Clorox Cleanup on top of the fridge so its easy for me to wipe down my counters after making a mess cooking. If I left it in the closet, I'd probably never do it. - User:ChrisMetcalf
  • Put a clock in your bathroom. Then you know exactly how late you're running in the morning - User:ChrisMetcalf
  • When you are finished with a toilet paper roll use it to hold a spare computer cable. It beats rubber bands or twist ties - although you may not win points for style! --KLB 8:07, 29 Mar 2005 (EST)
  • Anytime you finish a major task or project write it on a small piece of paper and stab it on a message spindle. Keep the message spindle on your desk as a reminder of what you are (or are not) getting done. The spindle will be helpful when drafting status reports or undergoing a performance review.
  • If you want to strip DRM from your iTunes so they work with things like the Sonos player, try this: burn an audio CD (not data CD) of your legally bought itunes, and then rip that CD. Your songs are no longer Protected AAC. "Note: I consider this fair use, but legally it's not." --JohnGraham 17:30, 29 Mar 2005 (EST)
    • This is absolutely legal. This is covered under "Fair Use" laws in the US and the iTunes license permits in other countries as well. (You have the right to make backups of media that you purchase for your own use.) --Rosso 13:56, 3 Apr 2005 (EDT)
    • This is probably the easiest way to remove encryption, but it results in a pretty significant loss of quality. Mac users can try the Hymn Project's software... it removes digital rights management from your songs but leaves your account information in place. At best, it's quasi-legal. --jagtrev 00:42, 30 Mar 2005 (EST)
  • Have yourself a Mini Retreat. --Murdaugh 13:43, 30 Mar 2005 (EST)
  • If you need a doorstop in a jiffy but can't afford to block the entryway with a heavy object (such as when you're moving furniture), take a wire clothes hanger and fold it in half vertically so the two shoulders meet. Shove this under the door. --Merkuri 19:08, 30 Mar 2005 (EST)
  • Need to un-fog that steamy mirror after a shower, but don't want to smudge it? Use a hair dryer! --Merkuri 19:37, 30 Mar 2005 (EST)
  • Don't do it because it's "humane", do it because it works. Catch flies with a cup and a piece of paper. When the fly lands, slowly approach it with the cup. The last half-inch or so, you can slam it down, but before then move slowly enough so the fly won't feel the rush of air that triggers it to fly away. Then slide the paper under the cup and take the fly outside. If you perfect this method, you can catch flies in a few minutes, rather than swatting at them unsuccessfully for hours. Don't try to be faster than the fly, be smarter! --Merkuri 8:06, 31 Mar 2005 (EST)
    • If you don't mind killing the fly and washing your hands, you can effectively catch flies 90% of the time by clapping your hands about an inch over their heads after they've settled. The motion of your hands scares the fly into launching itself directly into the path of your hands coming together. --Cwenham 11:32, 31 Mar 2005 (EST)
  • When the sheets and pillowcases come out of the dryer, fold them and tuck them into one of the newly-clean pillowcases before placing the package back in the linen closet. That makes it easy to grab exactly the items you need when a bed needs clean sheets.--MJP
  • I meta-catagorise my itunes playlists by putting CD in front of CD length playlists, EP in front of other mixed playlists (e.g. EP Cohen (4hrs of music that Seth from OC would listen to)), LP for artist or group playlists, OST for soundtracks and W for music by world genres. I find it keeps things together a little better. You can use the browser in the library, but most playlists I use this for are mixed so don't come up right, and you can also keep the right order if you want to rearrange them. --Sophia
  • When shopping, try and find a place to pay at the back of the shop, they are normally quieter than the ones at the front. --Sophia
    • Another shopping hack, if you go to a regular supermarket, make a checklist based on the layout of the store and your normal buys (i.e. following the route you normally take around the shop). Stick it on the fridge, and when you run out of something, tick it on the list. Then when you go shopping you can follow the route straight round without forgetting things and doubling back (hopefully) - Sophia
  • For seniors who get confused about their pills: organize them by time period (morning, evening, etc) and then take a photo of each. Annotate the pictures with labels. Print and hang it over their pills bottles for a visual reference --KLB 10:34, 31 Mar 2005 (EST)
  • If you want to hang up on someone, but don't want the drama that follows, hang up while YOU're speaking -- since no reasonable person would hang up while speaking, the other party will assume that you're having phone problems. Then just don't answer when they call back.--J.T. Boofle 23:26, 31 Mar 2005 (EST)
    • If you've got a phone with an unscrewable antenna you could always just unscrew it and REALLY get disconnected. Or you could just switch to AT&T Wireless. -- ChrisMetcalf
  • Mobile phones are great, but they can serve as an interruption in the flow of your day and ultimately cause more harm than good. One solution is to just leave it at home, but that's kind of cutting off your nose to spite your face. Try to get a cell phone that allows you to categorize your contacts and change the ringtones/settings for each group and in every ring profile (ie. silent, normal, noisy, etc.). Then just make some of those groups completely silent under one of your ring profiles so that those people can't interrupt you when you don't want them to. Leave some important contacts in groups that always ring if you really want/need to. It's okay sometimes for you to get interrupted or for you to have to suddenly switch contexts while in the middle of something (for instance, a very important friend who I may not hear from often is always welcome to interrupt). Just make sure that when it happens, it really is worth it, and it's not just some randomly useless event that could've been avoided. What's important to you could be business or personal, just make sure it really is important. --ThePolack 13:34, 3 Apr 2005 (EDT)
  • Airport/Big Ass Event parking mnemonic: : use Your Zire7x / camera phone and get a picture of the locator sign nearest your car. Take 30 paces toward the event, turn around, face your car and photograph what the final approach would/should look like. Instigase
  • Kids and power tools: The plugs on power tools in the US have a small hole on each prong. To prevent children from plugging these in, put a small luggage lock through the hole and put the keys somewhere they won't find them. --y0mbo
Personal tools