Travel Information and Documents

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The basic idea above is to be able to quickly access your records, or pointers to them, from any readily available communications device. --[[User:Gochess|gochess]] The basic idea above is to be able to quickly access your records, or pointers to them, from any readily available communications device. --[[User:Gochess|gochess]]
 +
 +=== Disaster Preparation ===
 +
 +A <i>New York Times</i> [http://www.nytimes.com/2005/10/01/business/01docs.ready.html?ei=5090&en=afb8b0c8f19b21aa&ex=1285819200&partner=rssuserland&emc=rss&pagewanted=print article] has generalized preparation to include:
 +* mirroring data to an encrypted USB flash drive;
 +* medical records, for example,
 +** digitized copies of X-rays, scans and electrocardiograms;
 +** more mundane, medical and optical prescriptions.
 +* "tax returns for the last three years, a recent pay stub, birth certificates, marriage license, the deed to your home and insurance policy pages that list your coverage."
 +
 +If you do not have a scanner, a decent copy shop can force feed your documents into PDF files on a CD. --[[User:Gochess|gochess]]
== Information for Customs and Immigration == == Information for Customs and Immigration ==

Revision as of 16:41, 3 October 2005

Contents

The Five Essentials

Ticket. Money. Passport. Address/phone number of where you are going. Any necessary prescription medicines. Even if you lose everything else, you'll still reach your destination. If you often stress out while travelling checking you have the "five things" at regular intervals can be really helpful.

Recovery Preparation

Suppose you lost all your papers during your trip... starting from this assumption, imagine how you would have recovered:

  • Old fashion: make photocopies, and leave them with a trusted friend or relative -- who will presumably read off the information in an emergency, or mail them to you. Too cumbersome, and untimely!
  • Before embarking on your trip, leave yourself voice-mail with vital information: especially confirmation codes for reservations you have made. Reservations on paper has become a relic because the originator can readily access it on their server, given the code.
  • Alternative back-up: scan documents and e-mail them to yourself as attachments. This assumes that you can access readily your e-mail from any public terminal.
    • If security is a concern, encrypt the scanned document. E.g. scan into PDF and encrypt via Acrobat. For identification papers, use stronger encryption methods.

The basic idea above is to be able to quickly access your records, or pointers to them, from any readily available communications device. --gochess

Disaster Preparation

A New York Times article has generalized preparation to include:

  • mirroring data to an encrypted USB flash drive;
  • medical records, for example,
    • digitized copies of X-rays, scans and electrocardiograms;
    • more mundane, medical and optical prescriptions.
  • "tax returns for the last three years, a recent pay stub, birth certificates, marriage license, the deed to your home and insurance policy pages that list your coverage."

If you do not have a scanner, a decent copy shop can force feed your documents into PDF files on a CD. --gochess

Information for Customs and Immigration

On outbound flights, there's always someone panicking because they don't have a note of the address of their hotel and they need to write it on the customs/immigration card. It also really helps if you carry a pen to fill this card in. You can usually crib one from someone after they're finished, but it cuts the time you have to fill it in.

If you're travelling to a country you haven't been to before, knowing the exact address and phone number you are going to is invaluable once you're at the airport or train station. Being able to call the hotel and ask directions, or showing them to a taxi driver who might not speak your language is invaluable. I always carry a printed itenerary of where and when I'll be along with the address and phone number. It's usually just one sheet of paper and I can keep it with my passport.

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