Supplementing Airline Rations

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On long flights, sometimes it gets to be a long time between food, or you just get hungry. Nuts and Raisins are a good snack food to take, but it's a good idea to put the bag of nuts inside a resealable freezer bag or something. The last thing you want is peanut debris in the bottom of your backpack. Don't take bananas - too squishable. A bottle of water is also a good idea because cabin air is dry. On long flights, sometimes it gets to be a long time between food, or you just get hungry. Nuts and Raisins are a good snack food to take, but it's a good idea to put the bag of nuts inside a resealable freezer bag or something. The last thing you want is peanut debris in the bottom of your backpack. Don't take bananas - too squishable. A bottle of water is also a good idea because cabin air is dry.
-* Don't take peanuts. They can cause death to your fellow passengers (this is why airlines now pass out pretzels).+* Peanuts can cause death to your fellow passengers with severe peanut allergies (this is why airlines now pass out pretzels). Don't allow them to fall onto the floor, etc.
* It is not advisable to take extra food onto flights with destinations in Australia. Quarantine restrictions mean that you will be required to dispose of fruit and other foodstuffs when you leave the plane, even if you are only crossing state borders within Australia (there are special sniffer beagles in most airports to catch people carrying unauthorised food!). Any decent carrier will let you have a snack out of normal meal times on a long-haul international flight. So unless you have particular medical needs, you really only need extra food on budget domestic carriers. * It is not advisable to take extra food onto flights with destinations in Australia. Quarantine restrictions mean that you will be required to dispose of fruit and other foodstuffs when you leave the plane, even if you are only crossing state borders within Australia (there are special sniffer beagles in most airports to catch people carrying unauthorised food!). Any decent carrier will let you have a snack out of normal meal times on a long-haul international flight. So unless you have particular medical needs, you really only need extra food on budget domestic carriers.

Revision as of 15:24, 1 June 2005

On long flights, sometimes it gets to be a long time between food, or you just get hungry. Nuts and Raisins are a good snack food to take, but it's a good idea to put the bag of nuts inside a resealable freezer bag or something. The last thing you want is peanut debris in the bottom of your backpack. Don't take bananas - too squishable. A bottle of water is also a good idea because cabin air is dry.

  • Peanuts can cause death to your fellow passengers with severe peanut allergies (this is why airlines now pass out pretzels). Don't allow them to fall onto the floor, etc.
  • It is not advisable to take extra food onto flights with destinations in Australia. Quarantine restrictions mean that you will be required to dispose of fruit and other foodstuffs when you leave the plane, even if you are only crossing state borders within Australia (there are special sniffer beagles in most airports to catch people carrying unauthorised food!). Any decent carrier will let you have a snack out of normal meal times on a long-haul international flight. So unless you have particular medical needs, you really only need extra food on budget domestic carriers.
  • A shortcut to making a long train or plane trip extremely memorable is to bring enough food to share. I discovered this trick accidentally when I made the stupid American mistake of forgetting how many pounds were in a kilo. Our impromptu buffet proceeded to transcend language barriers for the rest of the night. I have sometimes deliberately done this since on transpacific flights. Of course, be sensitive to cultural barriers and offer hospitality without offense taken if refused. --Jeff Porten 03/26/05 01:27 AM EST
  • Bottled water can always be purchased at the departure gates (the other side of security), so I don't bother packing one. I buy a bottle before boarding the plane at each leg of my journey and finish each before the plane lands, that way I force myself to stay hydrated during the whole journey. --AP 12:05, 4 Apr 2005 (EDT)
    • Also, some security regimes won't allow you to take unsealed liquid containers (e.g. Starbucks cups, Nalgene bottles) through security.
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