Food hacks

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** Use wax paper to separate the slices if you freeze it. This keeps the slices from freezing together and breaking when you pull them apart. --25 Mar 05 ** Use wax paper to separate the slices if you freeze it. This keeps the slices from freezing together and breaking when you pull them apart. --25 Mar 05
** Keep bread ends in the freezer, then give them a quick spin in the food processor to create fresh bread crumbs. [[User:Edward Vielmetti|Edward Vielmetti]] ** Keep bread ends in the freezer, then give them a quick spin in the food processor to create fresh bread crumbs. [[User:Edward Vielmetti|Edward Vielmetti]]
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 +* If possible, store only what you absolutely need to. Buy food to eat, not to store! --[[User:Robert Brook|RB]] 08:24, 25 Apr 2005 (EDT)
* Keep a list of what's in your freezer on the front of the door, saves you from having 4 unopened packs of chicken and no mince. When you put them in, write the date you freeze them on the list, so you can keep an eye on how long it will keep and what needs to be used up. --Sophia * Keep a list of what's in your freezer on the front of the door, saves you from having 4 unopened packs of chicken and no mince. When you put them in, write the date you freeze them on the list, so you can keep an eye on how long it will keep and what needs to be used up. --Sophia

Revision as of 12:24, 25 April 2005

Contents

Shopping

  • The least crowded time to shop at the cheap warehouse supermarkets during daylight hours is on Sunday, when church is in session. -- GH 21 Mar 05 (Or, if you live in a football-crazy town like Pittsburgh, during a Steelers game.)
  • If you live in snow country, use a cheap plastic sled to haul all your groceries at once from your car to your door in the winter. GH 22 Mar 05
  • You can buy spices at Indian grocery stores for a fraction of typical supermarket prices. --GH 24 Mar 05
  • Kitchen stuff is less expensive at restaurant supply stores. Stop licking your chops over the kitchen-porn catalogs. --GH 24 Mar 05
  • Ethnic grocery stores are a great source for inexpensive food and kitchen supplies. Don't be afraid if they don't look well-lit and friendly like the local mega-mart - the owners are usually more than happy to help you find what you're looking for, and often will be willing to special-order if you're looking for something particular. --Jeni 09:75 EST 3/26/05
  • Catering wholesalers often offer great value, but remember to check that the price you see is the price you pay. Advertised prices may be for business buyers only. --RB 08:23, 25 Apr 2005 (EDT)

Storage

  • Keep bread in the freezer- Tired of having your bread get moldy before you eat it? Keep it frozen, and just make toast when you want a sandwich. Don't store it in the refrigerator, though: that makes it go stale more quickly.Yesno
    • If you don't like to freeze your bread for maximum freshness, it'd be helpful to pay attention to the ties on your bread packages. They tell the dates the bread was baked: Monday - Blue, Tuesday - Green, Thursday - Red, Friday - White, Saturday - Yellow. --lure 25 Mar 05
    • Use wax paper to separate the slices if you freeze it. This keeps the slices from freezing together and breaking when you pull them apart. --25 Mar 05
    • Keep bread ends in the freezer, then give them a quick spin in the food processor to create fresh bread crumbs. Edward Vielmetti
  • If possible, store only what you absolutely need to. Buy food to eat, not to store! --RB 08:24, 25 Apr 2005 (EDT)
  • Keep a list of what's in your freezer on the front of the door, saves you from having 4 unopened packs of chicken and no mince. When you put them in, write the date you freeze them on the list, so you can keep an eye on how long it will keep and what needs to be used up. --Sophia
  • Food use by dates -- Some products have a recommendation of being used within x weeks of opening. Label the item using a permanent marker with that specific date. Note that manufactures err very much on the side of caution when coming up with these dates. If something doesn't look/smell/taste off, it probably isn't. --dbush 08:23, 17 Apr 2005 (EDT)
  • Got a shared fridge in a student house and tired of people nicking your milk? Decant it into a clear container and add some green food colouring. Doesn't affect the flavour, but does deter milk thieves. Add a label if you really want like "Seaweed-flavoured breast milk" or something else unappetising. -- S.

Preparation

  • For easy cleanup when you have a lot of vegetables to peel, line your sink with newspaper. It will hold up when wet and all you'll have to do is gather it up and throw everything away. -- GH 21 Mar 05
    • Along with lining your sink with newspaper (which is a waste of perfectly good litter liner :) ), you could just use a large bowl, and empty that and throw it in the dishwasher. -DB
    • Or, better yet, just peel them straight into the garbage can. In chef school I'd just pull the industrial can over to my station and peel away. At home, I'll peel right into the compost bucket, if I'm composting at the time. --JW 23 Mar 05 ( bonus of this is that you don't need to chop your compost! nice tip JW. )
    • If you do go with the newspaper base for peeling veggies, you can throw the whole thing -- paper and peel -- right into a composter. --JP 24 Mar 05
  • Have whipping cream but no mixer (and you don't want to do it by hand)? If you have one, a blender (like for milkshakes) works in a pinch. Put on high speed, and only do a little at a time. Only takes about five seconds. Any longer and it turns into butter. --AWOL
  • When using a microwave, simplify the button pressing by being less exact (2m22s is one button three times instead of choosing 2m30s which is three buttons once each. ) Your food won't know the difference. -jsg 24 Mar 05 (This reminds me of Homer Simpson waiting 15 seconds for meatloaf and whining "Don't we have anything faster than a microwave?") -lmm 25 Mar 05
  • Making powdered chocolate milk or hot chocolate can leave you with a bunch of powdery "nuggets" floating on top of the beverage. Put the powder in

the cup first, then add a small amount of liquid. Stir this into a paste, then add the rest of the liquid. No more nuggets. --SP 25 Mar 05

  • "artisan bread" i.e. real bread. When you buy a nice crusty loaf to take home for dinner, you absolutely must "refresh" it in a ~425 F degree oven for about 5 minutes before serving. Improves the crust and loaf dramatically. -- LGU 25 Mar 05
  • Put gin in the freezer 10-15 mins before making a gin and tonic and it will be just the right temperature. -- Sophia.
  • How to cut... has step by step diagrams of the knife skills involved in preparing vegetables. Us sinistral (left handed) chefs will appreciate that the diagrams have both right and left handed versions. --dbush 11:29, 24 Apr 2005 (EDT)

Recipes

  • To make hot chocolate from scratch, put cocoa powder and sugar in the bottom of a coffee cup, then add just a little bit of boiling water to dissolve them. Once they are dissolved you can add milk to your heart's content and microwave. If you put in the powder first it never gets properly dissolved. --Edward Vielmetti
    • Standard ratio for homemade hot chocolate: 1:1 cocoa powder to sugar. After that, you can customize to your heart's content. Salt? Of course, but then go ahead with cayenne pepper, espresso powder, Pero (mmmm, chickory!), cinnamon, vanilla, hazelnut, etc. to taste --JW
    • If you have hot chocolate powder made with water not milk, add some milk at the end for extra creaminess. -- Sophia

Tools

  • If you make tea or coffee or hot chocolate or pasta a lot, invest in an electric tea kettle. They boil much more quickly than on the stove or microwave saving time and energy. --Edward Vielmetti
    • I like the Bodum IBIS kettle which lifts nicely from the charging base and is very fast. Build quality is not great though. -jsg Mar 25 05

Nutrition

  • Trying to figure out what 5-a-day (or more) fruits or vegetables to eat? Check out the Color Way. They're divded into Blue/Purple, Green, White, Yellow/Orange, and Red groups, which makes it kind of fun to figure out. Or as fun as fruits and veggies can get, depending on how you feel about them. ;) --RobertDaeley 00:39, 8 Apr 2005 (EDT)
  • 2005 Dietary Guidelines developed by the U.S. Departments of Agriculture and Health and Human Services. The new pyramid scheme, includes personalized plan and tracker, plus tips. (But no recipes for chili with finger tips ... ;-) ... ok, alright, veggie tips --gochess 15:31, 24 Apr 2005 (EDT)
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