In your car

From 43FoldersWiki

Jump to: navigation, search

[edit] Things to Keep in Your Car

  • Phone Books: Don't toss last year's phone books into the recycling bin just yet. Keep them under your car seat. They will not go unused. -- GH 24 Mar 05
  • Plastic Grocery Bags: If you don't already, start keeping two plastic grocery bags stashed in your car - under a seat, in the console, or in the glove box. The uses are numerous. Most notably, you can use them as litterbags. Or if you're prone to just throwing your trash about, they make great emergency clean-up bags right before that hot date. You want to keep two of them because a double-bag (one inside the other) will be very handy if, say, you've checked out a lot of library books, or if your drunken passenger suddenly feels the need to barf. Single bags won't cut it in those instances. If you have very small children, you might want to keep more than that on hand, as they are most useful for temporarily dealing with soiled diapers or wet clothes. --TresWife 03:02, 28 Mar 2005 (EST)
    • Go one step farther and grab a couple of "motion discomfort" bags from your next flight and keep those in your car. Then when your date/daughter/mother-in-law feels like tossing her cookies, can just hand over the very secure barf bag. They're small, sturdy, and have a sealable top.
    • If you don't fly, use gallon-sized ziptop bags. I get sick when I have migraines, and that's what I use on the way to the ER. Kat2 23:16, 24 Jun 2005 (EDT)

--JW 29 Mar 2005

  • Plastic Egg Crates: Get a couple of plastic egg crates and keep them in your trunk. This way, when you get groceries, you can put the round items in the crates and they won't roll around as you careen around corners. If they can nest inside each other, they take up less space when you're not using them. --ThePolack 13:54, 3 Apr 2005 (EDT)
    • If you buy collapsible crates for this purpose, they're there when you need 'em, and gone when you don't. Great for hatchback/wagon type cars to keep the canned goods from rolling all over. --steph
  • Spare Wallet: Sometimes I forget to grab my wallet on the way out the door. Since, where I live, it's illegal to drive without a license (and often registration) handy, I got around my forgetfulness by keeping a spare wallet with all the pertinent stuff inside the glove compartment. That way, I never drive without my license, registration, or AAA card. This is also handier to access than lifting your butt up of the seat to hand your license to someone outside the car. Chris Gruber 050328 @ 1704 EST
    • As a corollary to this, place your proof of insurance in your car as soon you receive it to avoid those outrageous towing and impound fees you they sock you with, when you're pulled over, if you forget to do this. -- GH 28 Mar 05
    • Or, do just the opposite. Put your keys inside your wallet (provided they're not too large and numerous). You can't drive without your keys, and you'll always have your licence and keys together.
  • Snow/Ice tools: Always keep these things in your car during the winter season:
    • A scraper (or two, see below)
    • A small shovel, preferably a collapsible one
    • Kitty litter (best grip/absorbency for the price)
    • Blanket
    • Tow rope, so that someone with a truck can pull you out of a ditch and not need a tow truck
    • Jumper cables, cheap ones can be picked up at any auto parts store. Most anyone will give you a jump if you have the cables. Keep the jumper cables even through the summer! You never know....
      • Cheap jumper cables are fine for smaller vehicles, but if you're driving a bigger car or SUV, spend the money on decent cables. I've rescued a few stranded people over time that were trying to get a boost with cables that were too thin. --apayne
  • Scrapers: Keep a large scraper (the kind with a brush on the end) in your trunk and a small one (a hand-scraper) in the back seat. In the event an ice storm you may be able to open your back seat, but not your trunk (or vice versa).--Merkuri 30 Mar 2005
    • If you find yourself in a situation (a.k.a. rental car) where a proper scraper isn't present, use a credit-card-like piece of plastic. If possible, avoid using those cards with magnetic strips. --AP 10:02, 14 Apr 2005 (EDT)
  • Styrofoam Cooler: If you get frozen foods shipped to you in a styrofoam box, keep an empty one in your trunk. This can be used to keep frozen items frozen on the way home from the store
  • Water Bottles: I always keep at least two water bottles in my minivan, one empty and one full & unopened. The empty bottle can be filled with water from a faucet or drinking fountain, or used for sharing a large drink between two kids. Fill a bottle with a squirt-type top (like the ones that come with sports drinks, etc.) with water to clean cuts and scrapes, rinse sandy feet, etc. --Caffeinated
  • Baby Wipes: Even though my kids are school-aged now I always keep a box or canister of baby wipes in the car. They can clean hands, faces, boo-boo's, pre-treat stains, stand-in for a quick sponge-bath, remove make-up, & they work great as a lubricant/soap for shaving legs and armpits (maybe faces too). --Caffeinated
  • Med-kit: I always grab a med kit: adult & children's pain relievers, asthma inhalers, Benadryl, chewable Immodium, and saline eye drops. This stuff can't stay in the car permanently like a first-aid kit because most of it can't withstand very high or low temperatures so I just throw it all in a food storage bag on my way out the door. --Caffeinated
  • Spare Tires! Always check that a potential used vehicle purchase has a spare tire: The other day I ran over something that sliced my front passenger side tire, instantly deflating it and throwing me into the berm and up against a high curb. I managed to keep control and get off the road and into a parking lot. I called AAA and the guy was there in seconds. I drive a 2000 Chrysler Town & Country which I bought used in 2002 and I'd never had a flat until that day. He went to get my spare, which should have been located under the van, and I had no spare tire. So my van had to be towed and I had to buy a new tire that night (the rim was okay, thankfully). This is something I never thought of checking for as it was my first used car purchase. Now my mechanic's on the lookout for a spare for me but it's going to cost me.Caffeinated
  • Supermarket Loyalty Discount Cards - Punch holes in them and keep them on a binder ring in your car or pack, so they don't stuff your wallet, but are accessible when you need them. (Use your walllet only for items you don't want stolen.) -- GH 21 Mar 05 [Vote: 0]
    • Only problem with this is if you might take a different car to go shopping, i.e. significant other's car. It is inconvenient to shuttle items back and forth between cars. Moore850 14:05, 5 January 2007 (EST)
    • Supermarket loyalty cards: Trade them with your friends periodically to gum up the quality of data they're mining about you. --Merlin 16:21, 23 Mar 2005 (EST)
    • Every supermarket loyalty card I have is in a fake name with a fake address. They don't check usually. I just have to make sure not to use credit cards or checks when using the loyalty card and it will never be associated with the real me. --ThePolack 13:19, 3 Apr 2005 (EDT)
  • Disposable Camera --Rosso 16:08, 3 Apr 2005 (EDT)
  • Clean pair of socks and shoes in trunk. (Never know when you step into that water-filled pot-hole unawares.)
    • Also to carry in the boot (or trunk), a blanket (useful for sitting on, wrapping injured animals or people in shock, protecting Christmas trees/furniture), plus a T-Shirt and a warm jacket.
    • I keep an entire change of clothes in my car - can't count how many times I've used it when babysitting.
  • Change: A jar of change for parking meters. Every so often I empty the change compartment of my wallet into it. If you live in a high-crime area and are worried about someone breaking into your car to get at your nickels and dimes, keep the jar at home and dip into it whenever you expect to park in a metered space. --Tully Monster 14:05, 22 June 2005 (EDT)
  • Envelopes for bank drive-through ATMs. Can be filled out ahead of time. --Tully Monster 14:08, 22 June 2005 (EDT)
  • Life Management Supplies: kid's plastic pencil box containing tape, scissors, rubber bands, safety pins, string, hotel sewing kit, toothbrush, pencil, moist towellettes...you get the idea. My husband calls this my McGyver Kit, and it has solved many a minor crisis. --robin


  • Raincoat
  • Tiewraps
  • Emergency flares
  • Duct tape
  • Flashlight
  • Pocket knife/swiss knife
  • A padlock
  • Pencil or pen and paper
  • Light sticks
  • First aid kit
  • Heating foot pads
  • Aspirin
  • Small axe
  • Emergency strobe light
  • Multi-head screwdriver
  • City map
  • Emergency food (non-perishable, like granola bars)
  • Matches
  • Warm gloves
  • Work gloves
  • Fire extinguisher (for those who want to be ready for anything...)
  • Traffic safety vest
  • Warm blanket
  • Shovel - An Entrenching tool Works well for this, also serves as a Pick/Mattock, and takes up less space too boot.

[edit] See Also

Personal tools